01:10 am, percontations
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[rant]
audio

I listen to a debate and am annoyed.

The topic: “Does the President Have Constitutional Power to Target and Kill US Citizens Abroad?"

This is a rant in audio form, because I don’t have the patience to type this out.

Sorry, I talk kinda fast.


04:28 pm, percontations
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thekidshouldseethis:

The Egg Painter, a beautiful profile of Elena Craciunescu and the traditional Easter egg painting that she skillfully enjoys in a small village in Romania’s northern region of Bukovina. Filmed by Prague-based Titus-Armand.

A friend of ours just recently learned how to create eggs like these. In Ukrainian, the folk art is called Pysanky, from the word pysanka and the verb pysaty, meaning to write. In this case, the writing is in beeswax, similar to batik. It’s a traditional art form in many countries across Eastern Europe.

You can read more at NPR’s The Salt, see more examples at Katya Trischuk’s Etsy Shop, and yay! There’s a DIY at Instructables.

In the archives: more eggs and a few more cultural traditions.

via @Colossal.


12:54 am, percontations
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manmadepowers:

sex-drugs-and-electoral-rolls:

itooamsydney:

No, my name is NOT too ‘ethnic’ for your tongue. Stop normalising white names.

Notes that this also applies to white people with non-normal names, which may nevertheless have a European origin.Anglo-elitism is not necessarily a colour-tied thing. 

And here we have an example of a white person derailing a post about the racial microaggressions faced by POC. I really don’t think the experiences of white people and POC are comparable in this regard: one is viewed as quirky; the other is seen as foreign.

+1. I have an adopted Anglo official first name (literally Old English in origin) that people are constantly spelling wrong. And that’s annoying as fuck, and even interferes with my life — to the degree that I’ve had to send back legal contracts to be redone and I’ve missed important work emails from employers because they couldn’t spell my name right. 
But, the annoyance and inconvenience I receive from people not being able to spell Shelley with two e’s (even though it’s right there on the things I send them) is no where similar to a person deciding — unilaterally — that Denglin, my Chinese name, is “too hard to pronounce” and could they just call me DL or something?
One is incompetence; the other is racist laziness. And the fact that I’ve had to adopt an “English name” for my teachers, classmates, colleagues, and employers to feel better about their own ineptitude is colonial bullshit. 
— Was going to end there, but another point on white privilege: I met a white girl at a UN event once whose parents decided to give her an ~African name~. People spent so much effort trying to get her name right, in a way they never would if a WOC had the same name. For a white girl, her ~African name~ (srsly, she didn’t even know what country in Africa; as if Africa consists of only one culture) was quirky and unique and special. For a WOC, it’s “…so do you have a nickname?”

manmadepowers:

sex-drugs-and-electoral-rolls:

itooamsydney:

No, my name is NOT too ‘ethnic’ for your tongue. Stop normalising white names.

Notes that this also applies to white people with non-normal names, which may nevertheless have a European origin.

Anglo-elitism is not necessarily a colour-tied thing. 

And here we have an example of a white person derailing a post about the racial microaggressions faced by POC. I really don’t think the experiences of white people and POC are comparable in this regard: one is viewed as quirky; the other is seen as foreign.

+1. I have an adopted Anglo official first name (literally Old English in origin) that people are constantly spelling wrong. And that’s annoying as fuck, and even interferes with my life — to the degree that I’ve had to send back legal contracts to be redone and I’ve missed important work emails from employers because they couldn’t spell my name right. 

But, the annoyance and inconvenience I receive from people not being able to spell Shelley with two e’s (even though it’s right there on the things I send them) is no where similar to a person deciding — unilaterally — that Denglin, my Chinese name, is “too hard to pronounce” and could they just call me DL or something?

One is incompetence; the other is racist laziness. And the fact that I’ve had to adopt an “English name” for my teachers, classmates, colleagues, and employers to feel better about their own ineptitude is colonial bullshit. 

— Was going to end there, but another point on white privilege: I met a white girl at a UN event once whose parents decided to give her an ~African name~. People spent so much effort trying to get her name right, in a way they never would if a WOC had the same name. For a white girl, her ~African name~ (srsly, she didn’t even know what country in Africa; as if Africa consists of only one culture) was quirky and unique and special. For a WOC, it’s “…so do you have a nickname?”


05:53 pm, percontations
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A meme

RULES:

-Must always post rules
-Answer the 11 questions given to you
-Create 11 new questions
-Tag 11 people
-Let them know that they have been tagged

NEW RULES

At will!

I have vaguely philosophical questions that I’d be curious to get anyone’s takes on! …Buuut, it’s hard to know who wouldn’t mind taking part and who would find it annoying..

So I’m going to tag people who will still love me even if they find my questions annoying :( evelora, chippokenabokura, manmadepowers, throughthefearandfire, outstarethestars — but this is open to anyone who wants to philosophise with me! I’m asking these questions because I want to know your point of view; so, if you have a thought, feel free to jump in. …I wonder if tumblr’s tag function actually works.

My questions after the cut; and then my answers to chippokenabokura’s questions after that.

Read More


02:09 am, percontations
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Memories of Murder | 살인의 추억 (2003) dir. Bong Joon-Ho

"Fuck, I don’t know."

This is what I mean when I talk about subtlety. This is a film that is absolutely riveting, and it’s the gradual shifts in the characters and storyline that do it — by the time you realise just how much has changed, the film has built to this unstoppable crescendo. A powerful film; a tragic film, and an incredible watch. The sequence right before the final scene is perfect. It is exactly what needed to happen; echoing events and sentiments expressed before without coming off too obvious is a wonderful skill.
The actors and characters are amazing in this film. The two main leads go through a similar progression, in opposite directions — a fascinating dynamic. This is also a film that doesn’t have many female characters, but for once the overwhelmingly male dominated culture works for the storyline — this is actually how I’d like to see predominantly all-male casts used: where it serves a purpose to the story. A warning: there is a lot of violence towards women here, rape specifically. They don’t show the acts in progress (ah, wait, there is one…) but you do see dead bodies and they do talk about the attacks in detail. This film is based on real events, a string of serial murders in South Korea in the late 1980s.
Hands down one of the best films I’ve seen in recent times — will probably even make my favourites list. So good, only made four screencaps, because I do not want to give away what happens. Avoid the tag at all costs; ending spoilers are everywhere.
The opening and ending shots are beautiful — eerily creepy in how gorgeous the colours are, especially when the majority of the film is a heavy, moody grey. But they work so perfectly as bookends. The final moments of this film are incredibly well done. Incredibly well done. I won’t say any more, but this is definitely a film to watch. 

Memories of Murder | 살인의 추억 (2003) dir. Bong Joon-Ho

"Fuck, I don’t know."

This is what I mean when I talk about subtlety. This is a film that is absolutely riveting, and it’s the gradual shifts in the characters and storyline that do it — by the time you realise just how much has changed, the film has built to this unstoppable crescendo. A powerful film; a tragic film, and an incredible watch. The sequence right before the final scene is perfect. It is exactly what needed to happen; echoing events and sentiments expressed before without coming off too obvious is a wonderful skill.

The actors and characters are amazing in this film. The two main leads go through a similar progression, in opposite directions — a fascinating dynamic. This is also a film that doesn’t have many female characters, but for once the overwhelmingly male dominated culture works for the storyline — this is actually how I’d like to see predominantly all-male casts used: where it serves a purpose to the story. A warning: there is a lot of violence towards women here, rape specifically. They don’t show the acts in progress (ah, wait, there is one…) but you do see dead bodies and they do talk about the attacks in detail. This film is based on real events, a string of serial murders in South Korea in the late 1980s.

Hands down one of the best films I’ve seen in recent times — will probably even make my favourites list. So good, only made four screencaps, because I do not want to give away what happens. Avoid the tag at all costs; ending spoilers are everywhere.

The opening and ending shots are beautiful — eerily creepy in how gorgeous the colours are, especially when the majority of the film is a heavy, moody grey. But they work so perfectly as bookends. The final moments of this film are incredibly well done. Incredibly well done. I won’t say any more, but this is definitely a film to watch. 


12:17 am, percontations
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Perceptions and political framing

By now most people have heard about CNN reporter, Jeanne Moos, and her piece covering the British royals’ visit to NZ. If not, here’s a short summary. I woke up this morning to friends liking that fb post; okay, that should not be surprising. (Ignoring the rewriting of NZ history the commentators are doing there — wait no, let’s not ignore it: to say “In NZ we embrace and accept our native culture” is inaccurate and definitely an oversimplification.)

But what did interest me were the number of comments along the lines of “It’s America, what did you expect” and “Typical ignorance from Americans” — in fact, one comment says: “So often we stereotype Americans as being culturally ignorant - and then along comes something like this that just reenforces that stereotype!

I think one of the short falls of the US is that its news coverage is so insulated and filtered that Americans don’t realise what their international public image is like. Rather than being the heroes and saviours of the world, it’s far more likely to be the above^: the image of Americans is that they are deeply ignorant, blundering in as bullies and making things worse and then going home to gorge on super-sized hamburgers or sth. Now, obviously that’s not true; you don’t get to be a superpower and control most of the world’s international institutions by being truly stupid. — But that’s the story that has stuck. And when you ask non-Americans what they think a typical American is like, that’s the general perception that you’ll get. The story doesn’t have to make logical sense, it just has to feel like it does.

And that’s the same for political framing.

I think framing matters. I read an article in the aftermath of the Marriage Amendment Bill passing that dissected why it had an easier time in NZ than the UK and France — conclusion: framing the issue as one of “marriage equality” rather than “gay rights” made a difference. More people can get behind the idea of equality than they will care about a minority group’s rights. (Also, I personally prefer marriage equality because it’s not just gay folks who are affected.)

One thing I think leftists mess up sometimes is political framing — and conversely, the right can be pretty good at it. Think the “pro life” v “pro choice” naming, the left definitely lost out there. The seabed and foreshore, where the whole issue became one of access to beaches rather than extinguishing legal customary indigenous rights. And more recently, the “man ban”. Argh. 

Like I said, with a political angle the arguments don’t have to be logically perfect, it just has to give off enough of a perception of truth for a story to catch on.

How have the Opposition parties been framing the National government? They haven’t really gotten any traction. I’m a bit flabbergasted at how asleep the Opposition appears — like, when Simon Bridges “accidentally" opened up a whole DOC park for drilling, this is a story primed for an incompetence narrative! And yet, and yet! Where was the Opposition? And let’s face it, the whole Judith Collins + Oravida endorsement thing has died now. I have some thoughts on why Pansy Wong had to go but Judith Collins (white woman, in a caucus devoid of women atm, likely prime successor to Key) had to stay — but at the end of the day, the Opposition failed in presenting a convincing enough story. 

Also, when criticising the current government, I think a huge blindspot for leftists is that they’re so convinced of the correctness of their arguments — and so emotionally invested; equality is an emotional issue — that they repeat over and over the arguments that (only) work for them. There’s not enough focus on convincing (or manipulating) people not in your corner already. And sometimes they go too far, so that it becomes easy to write off leftist arguments as being over-sensitive or (the dreaded political phrase) out of touch

But that’s just one half of it. Equally important, the Opposition also have to come up with the narrative that they stand for. Right now, what does Labour stand for?… Not being National. Personal branding must differ from government criticism; it has to deliver a solution. Max Harris (of eternal law school fame) has an interesting proposition. He suggests “New Zealanders deserve better”, a variation of the “we can be so much more” storyline.

Anyway, it’s late, so I should stop now. But something to think about. There’s a lack of strong, cohesive framing by the Opposition parties atm. And that’s something that needs to be worked on.


09:55 pm, percontations
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eau-so-sick:

The Heavy - How you like me now (Raffertie Remix)

Argh. Apparently the full version of this song doesn’t exist yet.


01:01 pm, percontations
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yamaharfang:

jamtastik:

quierosonreir:

rayquayza:

leeeeni:

thebeabook:

doctorbeifong:

A truly MINDBLOWING lesson on the origin of American Southern accents.

image

The gif could not be more perfect in describing what just happened.

yay historical linguistics!

Bruh holy shit

That’s so cool.

oh shit….

This is mad cool.

(Source: ask-changeling-lyra-open)


12:25 am, percontations
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carudamon119:

【萌え死に注意】 百人一首に挑戦する、猫の画像wwwwwwwwwwww 可愛すぎる!!

Cat playing card game

Poem card  Hyakunin isshu


03:03 am, percontations
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manmadepowers:

This was posted in one of the better Facebook groups I’m in: on-point “parody” of Royals regarding racial stereotypes in TV/media casting.

Was also just posting about this. I think it should be followed up by the video embedded in this article. It’s a short film by Roseanne Liang on typecasting in a NZ context. 

But what I really love about Liang’s movie — and why it’s important to have WOC making films about WOC — is that her last scene leaves me happy. It’s quite a depressingly true film to sit through; but at the very end she doesn’t leave her Asian girls hopeless and despairing at the world. It’s a film about racial stereotypes and discrimination, but I left it feeling good. That’s so important. There’s so much activism rhetoric built around “You are doomed. Doomed. Rawr rawr rawr etc.” that we forget we also need to build each other up.

Unfortunately though, this video is geoblocked to non-NZ ip addresses.